Britain’s most pointless cycle-lane – is a perfect U-TURN

July 18, 2016 | by | 0 Comments

Council chiefs have been blasted for creating Britain’s most pointless cycle-lane – which is designed in a perfect U-TURN.

Council chiefs have been blasted for creating Britain's oddest cycle-lane which is designed in a perfect U-TURN (SWNS)

Council chiefs have been blasted for creating Britain’s oddest cycle-lane which is designed in a perfect U-TURN (SWNS)

The bizarre curved stretch of path, which is just two metres long, is near a junction between a quiet residential street and main road.

Some cyclists think it was created to stop handlebars catching a lamppost but have criticised council bosses for making it more difficult to tackle the junction.

The odd semi-circular cycle lane is at the junction between Lynton Road and Bramcote Lane in Chilwell, Nottingham.

Jamie Ireland, owner of the Cycle Inn bike shop, said he was bemused by the odd U-turn shape of the path.

He added: “I think random is the right word.

“A lot of the time these strange cycle lanes, and I know of about four or five, can cause more confusion than anything.

“You’ve got a cycle and pedestrian path on Bramcote Lane then finally you get a clearly defined cycle path and it doesn’t seem to make any sense.

“It’s absolutely ludicrous. People might be doing 25mph on the road and then suddenly they’ve got to flick onto the pavement and make a sharp turn.

“I’d imagine most people ignore it.”
SWNS_CYCLE_MADNESS_12Cyclist Ben Ireland, from Nottingham, who tried out the bizarre lane, added: “I’d consider myself competent on two wheels and I took my cycling proficiency test back at junior school.

“But the National Standards for Cycle Training doesn’t prepare you for such a strange obstacle.

“On approach I was unsure whether I had to signal or not so I went for it thinking ‘safety first’ is always the best option on the roads.

“Tackling the bend is something most cyclists should manage but it still feels unnecessary.

“You’d think it was designed to help you get round cars pulling out of the same junction.

“But if you followed it in full and there was a vehicle parked there, you’d just end up slowly going into the side of it.

“As I was turning left I was faced with a very sharp turn after coming out of the end of the cycle lane and had to put my foot down to regain balance.

“If I was turning right, I would have faced a different problem as I’d have been horizontal on trying to cross a busy road with oncoming traffic.

“Next time, I think I’ll just stick to the road.”
SWNS_CYCLE_MADNESS_03Keith Chong, who lives on Lynton Road, said the road is often used by cyclists trying to avoid the busier nearby Bramcote Avenue.

He added: “It’s a bit silly really but people do use it. When there are markings there people will follow them.

“It takes you back around like a dog tail.

“It sort of makes sense if you’re turning right, but not if you’re turning left.”

Tory MP Anna Soubry for Broxtowe has backed a campaign for safer cycle lanes on nearby Chilwell High Road and said the current cycle path is too close to new tram lines.

She also said it’s only a “matter of time” before someone gets killed on the road.

SWNS_CYCLE_MADNESS_11

Nottinghamshire County Council today (Mon) defended the bizarre U-turn cycle lane.

Gary Wood, the authority’s Group Manager for Environment and Highways, said: “Lynton Road forms part of the network of cycle routes in the Beeston area and is a signed route that links to the shared pedestrian and cycle route that runs east along the south side of Bramcote Lane/Chilwell Lane to Alderman White School.

“The section of the cycle route at the junction of Lynton Road and Bramcote Lane guides cyclists to cross Lynton Road to enable people to safely access the shared use cycle route on the south side of Bramcote Lane.

“Both Lynton Road and the cycle route at its junction are used by cyclists who see its benefits.”

Category: News

Add your comment

Libellous and abusive comments are not allowed. Please read our House Rules

For information about privacy and cookies please read our Privacy Policy