Chinese man jailed for selling fake Viagra highlights problem of counterfeit medicine

August 20, 2014 | by | 0 Comments
Unusual counterfeit goods including fake condoms and fake Viagra

Unusual counterfeit goods including fake condoms and fake Viagra

Counterfeit medication is becoming an ever-growing concern in Britain. Many cases go unreported as criminals and fraudsters continue to thrive in this black market industry.

As the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) revealed in May, £8.6 million worth of unlicensed medication was seized in the UK, including huge hauls of fake Viagra and other impotence medication.

Recently, Xiao Ping Yan from Barnet was sentenced to 16 weeks in prison for attempting to sell and supply a high dose unlicensed medicine for erectile dysfunction. Passed off as “Herbal Viagra,” the tablets contained 4 times the normal dosage of sibutramine and tadalafil (compounds that are banned in other supplements).

When used in combination, sibutramine and tadalafil can cause strokes and heart attacks. Legitimate pharmaceutical products withdrew sibutamine in 2010 due to compelling evidence of its health dangers.

Prior to this arrest, Mr Yan, aged 58, had committed a string of similar offences. In 2010, he had attempted to import over 50,000 tablets from China, which contained the prescription-only medicine, Tadalafil, but was stopped by customs at Heathrow Airport.

Once he had gone through a MHRA investigation, Yan was handed a 32-week suspended prison sentence.

MHRA officers launched a new investigation (at) Mr Yan’s home and found 5,000 tablets in boxes labelled “Diet Tea.” He was sentenced at Wood Green Crown Court.

Alastair Jeffrey, MHRA Head of Enforcement, commented: “We will continue to seek out and prosecute the kind of criminals who recklessly endanger public health by selling illegal unlicensed medicines. Products such as these, which are adulterated with high levels of pharmaceutical ingredients, present a real health risk.”

As criminals look to exploit new ways of obtaining profit from counterfeit medication, the MHRA has begun targeting social media and YouTube accounts to clamp down on these illegal sales.

Nowadays it’s become very easy to get hold of illegal medication. Especially if you are unaware of the health implications involved. It’s not uncommon for dealers to hand around health centers, gyms, shopping centres and high streets to lure in customers.

Everything from the packaging to the tablet itself can look perfectly legal, but it’s vital not to drawn in by false promises and untested medication.

When you need more information or urgent treatment for a private situation such as erectile dysfunction or something similar, the best option is usually to book an appointment with your local GP and discuss the history of your problem.

Those feeling shy or embarrassed about speaking directly about a sexual health issue have found that several safe and trusted online clinics such as meds4all.co.uk can diagnose the problem and even prescribe the necessary treatment without them having to leave the house.

For those who live busy lifestyles or travel widely throughout the year, ordering medication online may prove to be a quicker, more convenient option.

It is essential to check that the doctors and pharmacy used by the online clinic are registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). As verification, you can visit www.pharmacyregulation.org and type in the company’s registration number. If it isn’t registered then it may be somewhere to steer clear of.

With registered websites, you will have complete doctor-patient confidentiality and the EU Ethics Committee will stipulate all regulations, ensuring your wellbeing is priority.

The next time a stranger or friend tries to persuade you into buying unlicensed

medication, do the sensible thing and say no. Moreover, briefly remind them about the

potential dangers associated with peddling counterfeit medication.

Category: News

Add your comment

Libellous and abusive comments are not allowed. Please read our House Rules

For information about privacy and cookies please read our Privacy Policy