Dyslexic girl, 18, predicted to fail English A-Level exam scores top mark in the COUNTRY

May 21, 2013 | by | 0 Comments

A teenager predicted to fail her English A-Level was allowed to type an exam after being diagnosed with a form of dyslexia – and scored the top mark in the COUNTRY.

Clever Frederica Drewer, 18, had been told to expect a ‘D’ – until teachers realised she had dyspraxia.

The neurological disorder affects planning of movements and co-ordination as a result of brain messages not being accurately transmitted to the body.

18-year-old student Frederica Drewer from Bristol who suffers from dyspraxia but has achieved the best result in the country in an A-level English exam

18-year-old student Frederica Drewer from Bristol who suffers from dyspraxia but has achieved the best result in the country in an A-level English exam

Frederica was told because of the condition she had struggled to express herself with handwriting and would be allowed to use a lap top in one of her English A-Level exams.

She sat the paper just weeks later in January and she scored a whopping 99.5 per cent – the top mark in the entire country.

Frederica did so well that exam board AQA has now asked if they can use her paper as an example to students nationwide.

The exam module paper makes up part of her overall English A-Level exam and the predicted ‘D’ has now been changed – to an ‘A*’.

Frederica, of Bristol, said: “I was shocked when I picked up the results. I went in to school feeling quite down and I couldn’t believe it when I saw the 99.5 per cent.

“I was expecting to have to resit, but when I saw my result I was blown away.  The support I have got since my diagnosis has made a huge difference, I think.

“I have been able to organise my work better and have gone from a D to A* in one subject.”

Frederica was diagnosed last year after her English teacher at Bristol’s Ashton Park School noticed she was struggling.

She lives with her mum, Rebecca, a maths teacher, and dad Joe, a mortgage adviser.

Rebecca said: “People with dyspraxia have organisational issues and handwriting issues. Her English teacher noticed she was making mistakes which fitted the dyslexic profile.

“The diagnosis means she can now use a laptop to type up her exams rather than handwriting. The dyspraxia went undiagnosed for a long time.”

The student at Ashton Park School sixth form hopes to study philosophy at degree level, after a gap year.

Claire Ellis, spokeswoman at AQA exam board, said Frederica’s achievement during the exam on January 16 was “outstanding”.

She added: “To get either full or close to full marks is a wonderful achievement.”

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