Linda Rutenberg’s stunning photographs of real ‘Midnight Garden’ in glorious bloom

April 8, 2010 | by | 2 Comments

These stunning photographs show some of Britain’s most beautiful gardens at night and unveil the hidden world of flowers which bloom in the DARK.

The images were taken after sunset in a host of the country’s top horticultural venues including Kew Gardens and the Eden Project in Cornwall.

Photographer Linda Rutenberg spent months visiting the gardens taking snaps after dark to capture species which come alive when darkness falls.

Her pictures include lurid flowers such as the white moonflower, the evening primrose and Dutchman’s Pipe – which blooms at night to attract pollinating moths.

Species which Linda caught on camera include a torch ginger flower, calla lily, munstead lavender and Jerusalem sage – which all glow in half light.

Linda, originally from Canada but now living in Cornwall, has published her photos in a new book ”The Garden at Night – Private Views of Public Edens”.

She said the gardens are often unseen at night but are full of ”strange creatures and plants” which have a ”dreamlike and mystical” quality.

Linda said: “There was a pleasure of working after dark, with a tranquillity and peacefulness. There were wonderful fragrances and a mystery and sensuality of the darkness.”

Linda took her images in gardens including the Lost Gardens of Heligan near St Austell in Cornwall and Hestercombe Gardens in Somerset.

The book also features photos from the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew and the National Trust’s Sissinghurst in Kent.

Christopher Woodward, director of the Museum of Garden History in London, says people often miss out on the beauty of a garden at night.

He said: ”We visualise our gardens in the midday sunshine of May but Linda’s photographs show us that each garden has a second life during the hours of darkness.

”By night, flowers are independent of us – free to breathe, to move and to bend towards each other.”

The book is published by Thames & Hudson and costs £24.95.

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  1. Benjamin Disraeli said it best with: How fair is a garden amid the toils and passions of existence.

  2. Benjamin Disraeli said it best with: How fair is a garden amid the toils and passions of existence.

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