Is this the world’s shortest cycle lane? Council marks out bike path that’s just 8ft long

December 6, 2012 | by | 2 Comments

This has to be a contender for the world’s shortest cycle lane – barely longer than a bike itself.

The mini-marked path is just 8ft 2ins in length is on Ridgeway in Plymouth, Devon, off the Deep Lane Roundabout.

The loopy lane appears to beat previous challengers, including one an inch bigger which appeared in Cardiff in 2010 and cost an estimated £2,000.

The tiny cycle lane in Plymouth which is barely longer than a bike

The tiny cycle lane in Plymouth which is barely longer than a bike

The same year also saw an 8′ 8” effort in the Dutch city of Epe in 2010 – made even more ridiculous by official ‘Bike Path’ signs at each end.

One cyclist remarked: “It’s ridiculous. Is it really worth having such a small cycle path?

“You couldn’t cycle in it because it’s so small. You just have time to get in the saddle before getting off again.”

A Plymouth council spokeswoman said: “The red area marks where the off-road pedestrian and cycle route ends and cyclists join with general traffic.

“It is designed to alert motorists to cyclists joining the road, as well as give cyclists the space to do safely.”

They added: “It didn’t cost the council anything. It was paid for by the developer of a power station as part of its planning obligations.”

A spokesman for Plymouth City Council said it isn’t a cycle path – but the end of a cycle route.

He said: “This is not a 2.5 metre cycle path, it is the end section of a 1.67 km cycle route that runs from Sandy Lane to the Ridgeway.

“We have discussed this cycle route with both CTC, the national cycling charity and Sustrans, the charity behind the National Cycle Network.

“Both organisations take the view that this cycle route, which is a significant piece of infrastructure, represents a major improvement for cyclists.

“The red area marks where the off-road cycle route ends and cyclists join with general traffic.

“It is designed to alert motorists to cyclists joining the road, as well as give cyclists the space to do so safely.”

The spokesman added the path was provided by the developer of a power station and was not paid for by the council taxpayer.

Category: News

Comments (2)

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  1. AviationMetalSmith says:

    When was this done? The red paint doesn’t look very fresh.

  2. wunnell says:

    “You just have time to get in the saddle before getting off again.” Idiot!

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